Shopping Tips for Buying Clothes

Clothes by Emporio Armani, one of the most lux...

Clothes by Emporio Armani, one of the most luxurious and famous Italian fashion houses (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Fall is a great time to go shopping!  Fashion designers love the Fall too – because you are shopping for all of the designs that are shared during Fashion week. Top designs from these shows present the colors of the season, the length of our skirts, the width of our trousers, materials, patterns and many more fine tuned designs.  Fall is a big shopping season for both designers and consumers who are done with the summer colors and want something new.

Believe it or not, we as consumers, really do drive the fashion industry.  Either we buy it, or we don’t. If blue was a big color during fashion week, then you will most likely see blue in your local department store.

Now, as the consumer, you have an opportunity to respond to designers by either buying their ideas or passing by the rack that does not catch your fancy.

Below are some great tips to keep in mind when you head out to shop for your Fall wardrobe this year.

  • Printed designs catch the eye and tend to make certain areas stand out.
  • Flowers tend to enhance areas.
  • Horizontal stripes widen areas.
  • Vertical stripes will elongate your body.
  • Solid colors tend to be more slimming and tend not to accentuate certain areas.
  • A darker background color and big pattern will provide a slimming effect with a distraction – this can hide body flaws.
  • A solid dark color will provide a slimming effect and focus will be on your face instead of your flaws.
  • If you would like to make your hip and thigh area look smaller, go with a solid color bottom and a printed top.
  • If you would like to enhance your bust line, select a pattern that is bright with a busy pattern on the top and a darker bottom.
  • V-neck cuts give smaller chests a boost.
  • Ruffles accentuate the bust area.
  • If you have a wide waist area, gathered fabrics in a solid color reduce the appearance of a thick waist.

Happy shopping!!

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Fabrics and Textiles, visit a great site to make your own fashions

Chintz & Company on Homer St

Chintz & Company on Homer St (Photo credit: t-dot-s-dot)

A variety of contemporary fabrics. From the le...

A variety of contemporary fabrics. From the left: evenweave cotton, velvet, printed cotton, calico, felt, satin, silk, hessian, polycotton. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Have you ever made your own clothes?  Many of us believe this is an art left to fashion designers. When I was young, I took sewing classes in hopes to become the next famous designer.  I made some cute pieces that received many compliments.  Of course, I’m older now and those items have long gone to the good will.  If only I saved a few.  My creations of the 70’s may have made a comeback.  If you like to sew your own clothing, there is a great youtube site to check out for tips on creating your own one of a kind designs.  Learn how to make your own gladiator sandals, necklaces, shirts, hobo bags, scarves, costumes and much more.  This site incluces how to videos and information about sewing.  Visit:

http://www.youtube.com/threadbanger

below is a list of textiles and fabrics to use to create your own designs.

acetate

acrylic

alpaca

angora

barathea

batiste

broadcloth

bombazine

boucle

brocade

calico

canvas

cashmere

An example of cotton sateen fabric, used to li...

Electrically conducting yarn

Electrically conducting yarn (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Harris tweed fabric

Harris tweed fabric (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

calico

canvas

cashmere

chantilly lace

Terry cloth.

Terry cloth. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

challis

cheesecloth

chenille

chiffon

chintz

corduroy

cotton

crepe

crochet

dacron

damask

denim

elastic

eponge

Pills on a knit fabric
Pills on a knit fabric (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

faille

felt

flannel

gabardine

gauze

georgette

ginham

grosgrain

guernsey

harris tweed

ikat

jacquard

jersey

kasha

kersey

lambswool

lame

lastex

leather

linen

loden

macrame

madras

melton

merino

mohair

nainsook

nankeen

nylon

orlon

patent leather

polyester

ramie

rayon

sailcloth

sateen

satin

shantung

sheepskin

silk

spandex

suede

taffeta

tartar

terry cloth

tuele

tweed

twill

velour

velvet

velveteen

vicuna

viscose

voile

wool

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